Technophilia

Being in love with technology (aka ‘technophilia) is not as shocking as it may seem. A passion for inatimate things, living things, things that make our lives easier, and things that facilitate secret (or not so secret) desires has long since been a common thing; unspoken though it may be (Kelly, 2010).

Harlow (1958) introduces the concept of love after measuring a monkey’s preference of articial mothers. If, in 1958, a monkey can show an affinity for an inatimate object, why is it then so hard to admit or imagine that we are able to have real emotions for technology? Mary Chayko (2008) relays the emotional connectedness that we find using virtual technologies; relationships are formed and brought to fruition virtually every day. People, frustrated with their real life situations, find solace in virtual communities and online games which provide alternate realities for them to escape to (Zhou, Jin, Vogel, Fang, & Chen, 2011).

How can technology facilitate these accomplisments, and escape our attention and our devotion? An appreciation for the thing allowing us to reach our goals is inevitable. The more we embrace technophilia, the more prevalent it will become (Kelly, 2010).

References:

Chayko, M. (2008). Portable communities : the social dynamics of online and mobile connectedness. Albany: SUNY.

Harlow, H. (1958). The nature of love. The American Psychologist13, 673-685.

Kelly, K. (2010). Technophilia. In J. Dibbell (Ed.). The best technology writing 2010. New Haven: Yale University Press.

Zhou, Z., Jin, X.-L., Vogel, D. R., Fang, Y., & Chen, X. (2011). Individual motivations and demographic differences in social virtual world uses: An exploratory investigation in Second Life. International Journal of Information Management, 31(3), 261–271. doi:10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2010.07.007

Advertisements

My Serenity Encapsulated: A Few Thoughts

This is an amazing post (one of many) by a blogger I follow. It feels like the more emotionally rich way of talking about identities and identity verification. Mostly, I get lost in his wording and musings. And, afterall, storytelling is one of the most powerful tools we have. Nicely done, friend.

 

A few thoughts.

 

Essential Melodiness

So, here is what I love about studying identities: we are all made up of a variety of identities. We get to choose which ones we show, which ones we prioritize, how we define then, how we refine them, and how we use them to interact. When you ask someone (or even better, a group  of someones) to tell you who they are, their answers will vary vastly. Give them the task of choosing how to tell you, and the vastness of the variations expands. The colors, graphics, sounds, pictures, videos, words, textures, etc. that we use to produce something representative of our core all roll into that description as well. For more information on identities, check out the great book below. Meanwhile, here is my Glog introducing who I am. Enjoy!

Read More!

Burke, P., & Stets, J. E. (2009). Identity theory. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.

On a Personal Note…

 

Though I don’t typically write emotional responses here, I’m clearly an emotional being. That being said, it’s my blog, and I really want to share this amazing experience I had today; it’s been with me all day long. I want to talk about it because it’s something  that really hits home for me, as a large majority of my friends (and myself included) fall into the ‘alternative lifestyle’ category. I had the singular experience of having a friend come out to me today. Here’s the thing. I’m not SUPER close to him, but I adore him. He’s been a very good friend to some very good friends, and he is very talented. He’s always been SUPER nice to me and he’s very funny. Also, he likes the same comic book hero I do; there is NOTHING wrong with that. In fact, he harnassed that love of comics to help him with his expression.

I guess the thing on my mind is how honored I feel that someone who isn’t even all that close to me (granted, I’ve been secretly hoping we could be better friends), would feel comfortable telling me something this sacred. Only a few days after National Coming Out Day, I am still amazed at how many brave, resilient, kind people I’m surrounded by who have exclaimed that they are who they are and they’re proud. Though I’m not necessarily super quiet about my situation (polyamory), I’m not exclamatory about it either. It’s not something I’m proud of, but I do it in the interest of others who are connected to me; they have less accepting situations.

I digress. I guess I’d always wondered what it would be like to come out, but I hadn’t actually thought about it from the point of view of the recipient. I had considered other perspectives, though. My best friend was in a short scene this Summer. He played a gay father, whose son was coming out to him as straight. That was thought provoking in and of itself. I could spend all day thinking about it… it reminds me of when I considered the implications of tv coming before books (thanks to Steven Johnson). It makes me wonder what if the norm was homosexuality, and heterosexuality was the alternative lifestyle. But now, this is a perspective I can appreciate. That being said, I can’t imagine being anything other than honored and having a heart so full it feels as though it’s going to burst. I am very proud to be someone he trusts and someone who he has chosen to accompany him on this new path. I must be doing something right. And I hope & pray (to any god who will hear me) that anyone else who is honored enough to be trusted like this, realizes what an honor it truly is.

 

What is Social Media?

Defining social media is just as important as operationally defining any variable in any research. When a term or concept remains undefined, communication breaks down on a fundamental level. Individuals may discuss the same word with two very different concepts in mind. Social media has been defined as any platform facilitating communication, as well as the content which people share over social networks. Either way, before progressing into a world thick with social media, we must define it.

Social media facilitate and enhance existing and prospective social connections (Donath, 2004). Social media, in all their numerous forms, create opportunities for individuals worldwide to communicate (Rutledge, 2012).

Social media types vary based on their main functions in communication (Rutledge, 2012). Categories includes searches, blogs, wikis, folksonomy, and social networking; each category comes with a variety of applications, sites, platforms, and technologies to facilitate their particular function (2012).  Additionally, individuals may use the same social media in a variety of ways (Chayko, 2008).

Twitter is used to connect like minded communities based on interests and geographical locations (Java, Finn, Song, & Tseng, 2007). Facebook tends to be used to maintain and strengthen pre-existing relationships (Ellison, Steinfield, & Lampe, 2007). MMORPGs have been used to develop skill such as teamwork and leadership, as have first-person shooters (Cole & Griffiths, 2007; Jansz & Tanis, 2007). Social media are also used as a means of identity verification (Burke & Stets, 2009), overcoming social phobias and marginalization (Cabiria, 2008; Orr et al., 2009), and education (Barnett & Coulson, 2010).

References:

Barnett, J., & Coulson, M. (2010). Virtually real: A psychological perspective on massively multiplayer online games. Review of General Psychology14(2), 167–179. doi:10.1037/a0019442
Burke, P., & Stets, J. E. (2009). Identity theory. New York, NY: Oxford University Press. Retrieved from http://site.ebrary.com/id/10329671
Cabiria, J. (2008). Real Life + Virtual Life = One life by Dr. Jonathan Cabiria [Web Video]. Retrieved from http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N3qwdQLSt2I&feature=youtube_gdata_player
Chayko, M. (2008). Portable communities : the social dynamics of online and mobile connectedness. Albany: SUNY.
Cole, H., & Griffiths, M. (2007). Social interactions in massively multiplayer online role-playing gamers. CyberPsychology & Behavior10(4), 575-583. doi: 10.1089/cpb.200739988
 Donath, J. (2004). Sociable media.
Ellison, N. B., Steinfield, C., & Lampe, C. (2007). The benefits of Facebook “friends:” social capital and college students’ use of online social network sites. Journal of Computer-Mediated Communication12(4), 1143–1168.
Java, A., Finn, T., Song, X., & Tseng, B. (2007). Why we Twitter: Understanding microblogging usage and communities.
Jansz, J., & Tanis, M. (2007). Appeal of playing online first person shooter games. CyberPsychology & Behavior10(1), 133–136. doi:10.1089/cpb.2006.9981
Orr, E. S., Sisic, M., Ross, C., Simmering, M. G., Arseneault, J. M., & Orr, R. R. (2009). The influence of shyness on the use of Facebook in an undergraduate sample. CyberPsychology & Behavior12(3), 337–340. doi:10.1089/cpb.2008.0214

Rutledge, P. (2012, September). Social media 101 [PowerPoint].

Shadis Magazine – Strip #12

See on Scoop.itMedia Psychology Goodness

Dork Tower | This is a great example of prosumerism. Also, I’ve never been a fan of either show. But I LOVE John Kovalic.

See on www.dorktower.com

The History of Scrollbars [PIC]

See on Scoop.itOomph! Media Garage

Take a trip down memory lane with a look back at the history of scrollbars.

See on mashable.com

TEDsters Succeed. Here’s How!

LOVE this VERY brief TED talk on what leads to success. Easy to say; much harder to master. Oh, and be ready to laugh… hard.

10 Retro Game Gadgets That Scored an Extra Life

See on Scoop.itMedia Psychology Goodness

Your favorite gaming memorabilia has taken on new life as upcycled products for your home and office.

See on mashable.com